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Selected Extracts of Scots in Ireland

1300-1399


October 15, 1304
Letter attorney to Michael Winter and Stephen le Messager for Duncan son of Nicholas de Carrick to remain in Scotland for one year.
[Calendar of Document relating to Ireland 1302-1307 (London, 1886), Vol. V, p. 95, No. 278]

1305
A defeat was inflicted by Aedh, son of Cathal Ua Concobuir and by the Clann Muircertaigh also on the Muinnter-Raghailligh, so that Philip Ua Raghailligh and the heir of Clann-Suibhne and the Mag Buirrce, head of the Gallowglasses, together with one hundred and forty other persons, fell there.
[Mac Carthy, B: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1057-1131; 1155-1378 (Dublin, 1893) Vol. II, p. 403]

Note: The Muinnter-Raghailligh, is the Muinter-Reilly, and their head is Phillip O’Reilly. His Galloglass were the Clan Suibhne and Mag Buirrce.

1305.3
A victory was gained by Hugh, son of Cathal O'Conor, and the Clann-Murtough, over the O'Reillys, in a contest in which Philip O'Reilly, the heir of Clann-Sweeny, and Mac Buirche, head of the Gallowglasses, together with one hundred and forty others, were slain.
[O’Donovan, John: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland 1172-1372 (Dublin, 1856), Vol. III, p. 481]

1305.2
A defeat was inflicted by Aedh, son of Cathal O'Conchobhair, and by the Clann-Muirchertaigh also, on Muinter-Raighilligh, in which Philip O'Raighilligh, and the heir of Clann-Suibhne, and Mac Buirche, i.e. the head of the gallowglasses of the country, together with one hundred and forty other persons, were slain.
[Hennessy, W. M.: Annals of Loch Cé (London, 1871, reprinted Dublin, 1939)]

March 28, 1309
Licence granted to various persons to carry corn, peas, beans and oats from Ireland to the new castle of Ayr to sell to the king’s men and ministers staying there, for the provisioning of the castle and the maintenance of peace in those parts.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 9/84]

1309-1311
To John de Ergadia (Argyll), going to Ireland on the king's business, for wages of himself and men at arms, 100 marks. To the bishop of Argyll, staying in England at the king's expense, 10 marks.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1108-1516, Vol. V (supplementary), p. 232, no. 566]

1309-24
Petition by Sir Dougal M’Dowelle that the King would grant him the land of Sant Samoun in [Ireland] till he recovers his own estate, lost for the King in Scotland. The King has by his Council ordered Sir Dougall and the others to go to Ireland in his pay, and will reward them according to their ‘bon port’.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 156, No. 857]

October 6, 1310
John son of John Comyn who dwells in England, appoints Richard Comyn and another his attorneys in Ireland for 2 years. Biggar in Scotland.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 31, No. 167]

January 5, 1315
The King compassionating the losses and sufferings of John de Ergadia, now dwelling in Ireland, at the hands of the Scottish rebels, commands the Treasurer and Chamberlain of Ireland, taking counsel with Edmond le Botiller the justiciar and chancellor, to make provision for the decent sustenance of him and his family there. Langley.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 79, No. 415]

February 15, 1315
The King commands the Justiciar and Treasurer of Ireland, in addition to a grant to John of Argyll, to make good his losses from the Scots, to give him a further amount for the support of his men keeping the Isle of Man, as he hears that he has lately expelled the Scots rebels from said island and recovered it form King. Westminster.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 80, No. 420]

February 18, 1315
The King commands the Justiciar and Treasurer of Ireland to cause Moryauch MaKennedy and 22 accomplices, Scottish rebels lately captured by John of Ergail’s men and mariners on the sea coast of Scotland, at present secured in the Isle of Man – for whom the said John says he might have received a large ransom, but wishes them taken to Dublin Castle – to be brought there from the island.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 80, No. 421]

[March 25], 1315 A great fleet-host came from Scotland with the brother of the king of Scotland, that is, with Edward [Bruce], into the territories of Ulidia. Great forays were made by it on the people of the Earl [de Burgh] and on the Foreigners of Meath. A great host was collected by the Earl against the Scotch.
[Mac Carthy, B: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1057-1131; 1155-1378 (Dublin, 1893) Vol. II, p. 423]

1315
A battle [was fought] by the Earl [de Burgh] on the one side and by Edward [Bruce] with his force on the other side, so that defeat was given to the Earl and to the Foreigners besides. And William de Burgh and the two sons of Mac-in-Mhilidb were taken prisoners there.
[Mac Carthy, B: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1057-1131; 1155-1378 (Dublin, 1893) Vol. II, p. 427]

1315-1316
Compotus of Nicholas Goldyng and Hugh de Castro Knok, purveyors appointed to buy provisions at Dublin to send to Skymburness for the Scottish war, and afterwards ordered by Edmond le Botiller justiciar of Ireland, and the Council, in consequence of the arrival of Edward de Brus and a great power of Scottish felons in Ireland, to apply these for the castles of Dublin, Carrickfergus, Northburgh, and the town of Dundalk, and the pay and expenses of John de Ergadia admiral of the fleet, and his forces on the sea-coast of Ulster, from 2nd May 8th year (1315) till 20th March 9th year (1316):

No. 18: Crannocs of wheat delivered to said John de Ergadia and Dougal M’Douwylle and Doncan M’Goffry his knights, and their men-at-arms in the fleet, for wages; 7 casks of wine to same; 12 ½ qrs of bolted flour in 2 casks, delivered to same.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 92, No. 479]

1316
Petition by Donekan de Makoury (McGoffry) bachelor of Sir John de Ergeyl (Argyll), who had served the King and his father throughout the Scottish war, in which he lost his own father and his kindred, and had his lands destroyed by the Scots, against whom he has served this whole year in Man, praying for a grant of the ward of Nicholas de Ledewyche’s land in Ireland, with 20 merks yearly, and the marriage of his widow, so that he may maintain his wife and children till the latter are fit for the King’s service. The Treasure and Barons of the Dublin Exchequer to inquire and certify the King on the facts stated.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 99, No. 521]

February 28, 1318
The King grants to John de Athy for life, the manor of Glenarm in Ulster in Ireland, forfeited by the rebellion of Hugh Byset, who has joined the Scots. Dated at York.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 156, No. 632]

[October 14], 1318 Edward Bruce, the destroyer of Ireland in general, both Foreigners and Gaidhil, was killed by the Foreigners of Ireland by dint of fighting at Dun-Delgan (Dundalk). And there were killed in his company Mac Ruaidhri, king of Insi-Gall (Hebrides) and Mac Domnaill, king of Airthir-Gaidhil (Argyle), together with slaughter of the Men of Scotland around him. And there was not done from the beginning of the world a deed that was better for the Men of Ireland than that deed. For there came dearth and loss of people duing his time in all Ireland in general for the space of three years and a half and people undoubtedly used to eat each other throughout Ireland.
[Mac Carthy, B: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1057-1131; 1155-1378 (Dublin, 1893) Vol. II, p. 433]

Note: Edward Bruce was killed on 14 October, 1318.

1315-1316
Compotus of Nicholas Goldyng and Hugh de Castro Knok, purveyors appointed to buy provisions at Dublin to send to Skymburness for the Scottish war, and afterwards ordered by Edmond le Botiller justiciar of Ireland, and the Council, in consequence of the arrival of Edward de Brus and a great power of Scottish felons in Ireland, to apply these for the castles of Dublin, Carrickfergus, Northburgh, and the town of Dundalk, and the pay and expenses of John de Ergadia admiral of the fleet, and his forces on the sea-coast of Ulster, from 2nd May 8th year (1315) till 20th March 9th year (1316):

No. 18: Crannocs of wheat delivered to said John de Ergadia and Dougal M’Douwylle and Doncan M’Goffry his knights, and their men-at-arms in the fleet, for wages; 7 casks of wine to same; 12 ½ qrs of bolted flour in 2 casks, delivered to same.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 92, No. 479]

1316
Petition by Donekan de Makoury (McGoffry) bachelor of Sir John de Ergeyl, who had served the King and his father throughout the Scottish war, in which he lost his own father and his kindred, and had his lands destroyed by the Scots, against whom he has served this whole year in Man, praying for a grant of the ward of Nicholas de Ledewyche’s land in Ireland, with 20 merks yearly, and the marriage of his widow, so that he may maintain his wife and children till the latter are fit for the King’s service. The Treasure and Barons of the Dublin Exchequer to inquire and certify the King on the facts stated.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 99, No. 521]

February 28, 1318
The King grants to John de Athy for life, the manor of Glenarm in Ulster in Ireland, forfeited by the rebellion of Hugh Byset, who has joined the Scots. Dated at York.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 156, No. 632]

[October 14], 1318
Edward Bruce, the destroyer of Ireland in general, both Foreigners and Gaidhil, was killed by the Foreigners of Ireland by dint of fighting at Dun-Delgan (Dundalk). And there were killed in his company Mac Ruaidhri, king of Insi-Gall (Hebrides) and Mac Domnaill, king of Airthir-Gaidhil (Argyle), together with slaughter of the Men of Scotland around him. And there was not done from the beginning of the world a deed that was better for the Men of Ireland than that deed. For there came dearth and loss of people duing his time in all Ireland in general for the space of three years and a half and people undoubtedly used to eat each other throughout Ireland.
[Mac Carthy, B: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1057-1131; 1155-1378 (Dublin, 1893) Vol. II, p. 433]

Note: Edward Bruce was killed on 14 October, 1318.

November 10, 1319
The King commands the Treasurer and Chamberlains of the Dublin Exchequer to pay Sir Dungan MacGofferri £12, balance of the pay of himself and his men keeping the sea between Ireland and Scotland in the 12th year. Dated at York.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 126, No. 672]

November 1322
Letter from the burgesses of Droghda towards Mithe to King [Edward II]. They have spent much in strengthening the town with towers, walls and in other ways against Edward de Brus and other enemies of the land of Ireland, and also in sending men at arms and ships for the king's war in Scotland and Man, whereby they are impoverished. Justices in eyre have come to the town, so that they can go nowhere to trade, to recover their expenses. They ask that the eyre may cease, and that if the franchise is seized, and amercements made, the king may restore these. [Note in a different hand: the council grants that the eyre cease. If the franchise is taken it should be replevied until the morrow (28 Dec.) of St John, and all amercements put in respite until the same day, and before then the king should be informed as to why the franchise and amercements were taken, and the amount of the amercements.] They request letters patent to all the king's ministers in Ireland ordering maintenance of all franchises and free customs, on behalf of themselves and the burgesses of Droghda towards Uriel.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1108-1516, Vol. V (supplementary), p. 252, no. 681]

April 14, 1325
Protection and safe conduct to Walter Petit, Hugh Chepman and William of Marr, Scotsmen, and their crew of 12, going with their vessel to Ireland to trade, for a year. King’s Beaulien.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 158, No. 867]

October 28, 1328
King Edward III orders the pensions of the Abbot of Gedeworthe, Melros and Kelso, from certain churches in England, and those of the Abbot of Dundreynan, from Ireland, to be paid them, in terms of the treaty with Scotland. Dated at New Sarum.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 174, No. 967]

December 4, 1328
King Edward III sends to the Chancellor a petition from the Abbot of Dundreynan, to take order thereon in accordance with the peace with Scotland. Wyndesore.
[Enclosure] The abbot and convent of Dundreynan in Scotland pray the King, at the request of the King of Scotland, to restore their land of Bretneston in the county of Meath (Mide) in Ireland, from which they were ejected when war began, for no other reason than that they were Scots, as he is bound to do by the treaty.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 175, No. 969]

May 6, 1330
King Edward III of special grace grants to David de Strabolgi earl of Athol, son and heir of the deceased David de Strabolgi earl of Athol, and his countess Johanna, one of the cousins and heirs of the late Aymar de Valence earl of Pembroke, although he has not proved his age, the castle and manor of Odogh [Co. Kilkenny] in Ireland, and other held by his father and mother of her purparty.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 182, No. 1003]

May 12, 1335
Writ to the Chancellor to cause the Justices of Ireland to restore £10 of land called Bretonstone, in the sheriffdom of Meath (Midd’), to the abbot and convent of Dundreynan in Galway, which the King of Scotland has signified by his letter they have taken in the King’s hand. Pountfreit.
[Enclosure] The letter of Edward Balliol, urging the loyalty of the Abbot and convent to both Kings and their losses in consequence. Carlisle, 1st May 3rd year.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 208, No. 1157]

May 24, 1338
King Edward III at the request of John of the Isles (de Insulis), whose steady loyalty and exposure to perils in defence of his rights he well knows, grants to his cousin Hugh Byset certain lands in Glynairne in Ireland, forfeited by Richard de Maundevile. Tower of London.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 232, 1272]

June 12, 1335
To the Treasurer and Chamberlains of the exchequer. It was agreed that brother Andrew Leynagh, guardian of the house of the Friars Minor at Kildare, who lately went as the king’s messenger to the parts of the Isles of Scotland to treat with John of Islay [de Insula] concerning his retinue and say and know other things of behalf of the king, should the 60s. Order to pay him this amount. Dated at Dublin.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 41/36]

September 12, 1337
Robert Stokis, recently crossing to England with merchandise to sell there, was captured, together with other lieges and their merchandise, on the sea, by Scottish felons and enemies, and taken to the castle of Dunbretayngne, and delivered to McColmus le Flemyng, a Scot, constable of that castle, who promised his ransom for victuals to the value of 40m to be delivered to the constable. Licence to John Fauconer and John Preen to buy victuals to the value of 40m in the town of Drogheda by view of the major and sovereign of that town, and carry them to that castle and deliver them to McColmus for the delivery of the said Robert: such that no one who sends or sells any victuals there shall be troubled [etc.], nor shall the sailors who carry them, nor the said John [Fauconer] and John [Preen]. Furthermore, Grant that Roger Jo Weitesson, a Scot, who on another occasion was sent by the king’s order to the said castle for the delivery of the said Robert, may lawfully remain to the town of Drogheda until Robert is delivered from the castle and brought to the said town, and afterwards he may go wherever he wishes.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 42/17]

May 24, 1338
King Edward III at the request of John of the Isles (de Insulis), whose steady loyalty and exposure to perils in defence of his rights he well knows, grants to his cousin Hugh Byset certain lands in Glynairne in Ireland, forfeited by Richard de Maundevile. Tower of London.
[Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 232, 1272]

May 24, 1338
King Edward III grants protection and safe conduct till All Saints’ day for William Herbert of Droghda, William Hybert of Portroses, and Douenald Vinor, merchants, whom John of the Isles is sending to England and Ireland to buy victuals for himself. Tower of London.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 232, 1273]

May 26, 1338
The King wishing to please John of the Isles, grants protection and safe conduct to this cousin John Byset of Rachryn in Ireland, and his men and possessions there. The Town of St. Edmunds.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1307-1357, Vol. 3, p. 233, 1276]

May 4, 1343
Grant by Edward III to Roger Preston of a messuage and 2 [...] of land in Brettoneston which had belonged to the abbot of Dundreynan in Scotland, in the king’s hand because of the war.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828)]

May 4, 1343
Grant by Edward III to Roger Preston of a messuage and 2 [...] of land in Brettoneston which had belonged to the abbot of Dundreynan in Scotland, in the king’s hand because of the war.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828)]

March 4, 1346
A certain ship belonging to John Lyouns was freighted to the parts of Connacht and laden with various merchandise for sale, when John, and at the same time John Rykour, William Harrowe and William Horbord with others who were mariners of that ship, were driven with that ship by a sea-storm towards the parts of Scotland and cast upon the land there. Then one Dowenald McCaygh, Gillespyn McConnoghan, Gyllemychell McYnyn, and Cowan McCays, Scottish felons and enemies of the king, with others their accomplices, by force and arms attacked them on that ship, and took and imprisoned the said Rykour, William and William are still detained in the said parts of Scotland. And because the said John Lyouns, in that conflict, while the said enemies were perpetrating the premises, led his ship with the said Dowenald, Gillespyn, Gillemychell and Cowan by chance to the parts of Ireland, and detained the said felons who were imprisoned at Drogheda, seeking to have delivery of the said king’s faithful, and now detains them, just as appears by inquisition before the Judiciary of Ireland. LICENCE to the said John Lyouns to deliver the said Dowenald, Gillespyn, Gillmychell and Cowan from prison in the exchange for the said John Rykour, William and William and the said merchandise. Patent Roll, Year 20 of Edward II, dated at Dublin.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 49/53]

Note: McCaygh is the Scottish McCaig and in Ayrshire and Galloway and is derived from the name Mac Thoig, meaning son of Tadhg, an earlier Gaelic word for a poet or philosopher. McConnaghan is a form of McConachie or McConachy, Gaelic MacDonnachaidh, meaning son of Duncan. This name appears in the Ragman Roll of 1296, when Gilbert Maccoignache of county of Drumries rendered homage and fealty to Edward, king of England. A family of this surname is also found in the Isles of Bute, and is genetically related to the McGhies/McKies in Galloway. McCay or Kay is from the old Gaelic name MacAedh or MacEth, meaning son of Fire, now modernised to McGhie/McKie, a well established family name in SW Scotland. There are about five names in the Calendar of Irish Chancery Letter 1244-1509 that take the ‘McY’ style in McYnyn, namely, McYoughgan (1306), Moryertagh McYohegan (1308), Maurice McYnwhar (1375) and Cochonaght McYngellyn (1403). The name of Moryertagh McYohegan appears in another source in which he appears as Moryertagh Macnahegan, and in later we have surname McGeohegan.

1346
Great war arose between Ualgharc O'Ruairc and Ruaidhri, son of Cathal Ua Conchobhair. And battle was given by them to each other and defeat was inflicted on Ua Ruairc by Ruaidhri, son of Cathal and the gallowglasses of Ua Ruairc were all slain, namely, Mag Buirrce and the son of Niall the Lame and all their people, or for the chief part. And O'Ruairc himself was pursued and slain by Maelruanaigh Mac Donnchaidh. And this is the greatest deed that was done in Ireland from the death of Cormac, son of Cuilennan, downwards.
[Mac Carthy, B: Annals of Ulster A.D. 1057-1131; 1155-1378 (Dublin, 1893) Vol. II, p. 483]

1346
A terrible war arose between Ualgharg O'Ruairc and Ruaidhri, son of Cathal O'Conchobhair; and they gave battle to each other in Calraidhe-Locha-Gile; and O'Ruairc was there defeated, and all his gallowglasses were slain there, viz., Mac Burci, and the son of Niall Cam, and mostly all their people along with them; and O'Ruairc himself was pursued, and was slain by Maelruanaidh Mac Donnchaidh on that day.
[Hennessy, W. M.: Annals of Loch Cé (London, 1871, reprinted Dublin, 1939), Vol. I, p. 646]

1346
A war broke out between O'Rourke, i.e. Ualgarg, and Rory, the son of Cathal O'Conor; and an engagement took place between them in Calry-Lough-Gill, in which O'Rourke was routed, and all his gallowglasses slain, i.e. Mac Buirrce, and Mac Neill Cam with their people. O'Rourke was afterwards pursued by Rory O'Conor and the Clann-Donough, and was killed by Mulrony Mac Donough. This was a lamentable deed.
[O’Donovan, John: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland 1172-1372 (Dublin, 1856), Vol. III, p. 587]

August 1, 1357
Safe conduct at the request of John of the Isles, for John Longus of Portrush (Portrous), John son of Stephen, Doncan of the ‘Dormitory’, William of Ulster, Henry of Abyndon, and Adam le Taillour, merchants of the said Isles, to trade in England and Ireland and the King’s dominions, with their vessels and 6 mariners, making oath to ship nothing for the king’s enemies in Scotland, and to produce in Chancery the certificate of John of the Isles that their goods were discharged in the Isles, within 3 months thereafter. Dated at Westminster.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1357-1509, Vol. 4, p. 298, no. 1639]

July 1, 1360
Pardon by Edward III of debts to the earl of Kildare for his services in Scotland.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828)]

June 4, 1363 King Edward III releases John Comyn, who had gone to Ireland in the service of Elizabeth duchess of Clarence, with her husband Lional duke of Clarence, from payment of subsidy for his lands there. [Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1357-1509, Vol. 4, p. 19, no. 80]

July 8, 1365
Fiat for protection till Easter next for Sir Simon Flemyng, knight, who is in Ireland in the king’s service under Leonel, duke of Clarence.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1357-1509, Vol. 4, p. 24, no. 113]

July 28, 1368 King Edward III orders Thomas de Roos of Hamelak, and 15 others [among them Johan Comyn and David Strabolgi earl of Athol], to array men-at-arms for the defence of the disturbed parts of Ireland and to attend the Council at Westminster at the quinzaine of Michaelmas to report their diligence.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1357-1509, Vol. 4, p. 33, no. 145]

May 14, 1370
King commands William de Wyndesore his lieutenant in Ireland, to see that restitution of their lands is made Anabilla the widow and the heirs of the late John Comyn, who died before Easter last, and for his faithful service to the late Lionel duke of Clarence, had special exemption till Easter from going or sending men to Ireland in defence of his lands there.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1357-1509, Vol. 4, p. 39, no. 167]

May 10, 1371
Grant for his good service in Ireland and elsewhere, and in Lombardy under the later Lionel duke of Clarence, to Margaret, Milisent, Johanna and Elena the daughters and heirs of the late John Comyn, of their father’s manor of Kynsale in the county of Dublin; saving to Anabilla his widow her dower there from.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1357-1509, Vol. 4, p. 42, no. 183]

February 8, 1375
Grant to William Symcik and John Asshewell, burgesses of Drogheda that they may load 20 weys of any kind of grain in any ports in Cos. Dublin, Louth and Meath and transport it to foreign parts.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 95/180]

March 26, 1375 Robert Erskyn of Scotland, knt, that he may load for 2 weys of wheat and 1 malt to be transported to Scotland by John Gray of Are [Ayr], his merchant.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 95/194]

March 26, 1375 John of Are [Ayr] of Scotland that he may load one wey of wheat to be transported to Scotland.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 95/193]

March 26, 1375
Archibald Douglas of Scotland that he may load 3 weys of wheat and 2 of malt to be transported to Scotland by John Moungomery, his merchant.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 95/192]

April 10, 1375 Licence to William Symcok, seneschal of the town of Drogheda on the side of Meath, and to John Asshewell and John Stamen, burgesses, to sell bread and ale to John del Ontyles of Scotland, who is at the king’s peace and faith, for the sufficiency and needs of his household and his men when they come to the said town with galleys from time to time [etc.]. Licence also to the men [of John del Ontyles], and load the same in the said galleys and transport and deliver them to wherever the said John del Ontyles is staying, any proclamation, prohibition or ordinance to the contrary notwithstanding. Dated at Dublin.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 96/218]

October 11, 1375
The abbot of the house of the Blessed Mary of Dundraynan in Galwey [Galloway] has a similar licence to load 2 weys of wheat and 1 wey of any other type of grain in any port in Ireland and to transport them to Galwey for the consumption of this house.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 75/231]

March 20, 1386
Considering the damage that the king’s enemies of Scotland have perpetrated on the sea-coasts, appointment of John Asshewell, John Walsh and John Frenssh, burgesses of Drogheda, to take ships and mariners, etc, to sail upon the sea in order to capture those enemies.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 127/243]

February 16, 1387
Licence by the marquis, on the advice of the Lt and council, to Robert Savage that he may marry Christiana, daughter of the John de Isle, Lord of the Isles.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 137/218]

September 1, 1388
Commission by mainprize of John Shriggely and Nicholas Castelmartyn of Co. Meath to Thomas Gower clk of custody of the lands that belonged to the abbot of Dundreynan in Brittounestoungalwey, Co. Meath.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 139/68]

August 29, 1389
Commission by mainprize of Richard Sydgreve and Roger Swayn of Co. Meath to Robert Suttoun of custody of the lands, etc, that belonged to the abbot of Dundreynan in Brittounestoungalwey, Co. Meath.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 143/38]

May 16, 1394
Dated at Dublin, to the Treasurer and chamberlains of the EX:
Revocation of letters patent by which the King committed to Robert Harbrygge the custody of the lands [etc.] in Brittonestongalwey, Co. Meath, that belonged to the abbot of Dundreynan in Scotland because of a prior commission of the same to Robert Sutton.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 151/28]

May 16, 1394
Dated at Dublin, to the tenants of the lands [etc., of Brittonestongalwey, Co. Meath]
Order to be intendant and respondent to Robert Sutton, the king’s farmer, notwithstanding the grant to Robert Harbrygge.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828), p. 151/29]

December 8, 1394
King to the Treasurer and barons of the Ex. Order to permit Robert Sutton to have all lands and tenements in Burtoneston Galwey, Co. Meath, worth £7 p.a., which were granted to him for life, to have without rendering anything. Those lands and tenements formerly belonged to the abbot and convent of Dundreynan in Scotland and were forfeited because the abbot adhered to the King’s Scottish enemies.
[Rotulorum patentium et clausorum cancellariae Hiberniae calendarium (Dublin, 1828)]

April 5, 1399
Fiat for protection for a year for Sir Walter Styward, knight, about to set out with the king and in his service to Ireland. Also, on 20th April for Henry Greve alias Haraude going to Ireland with the king.
[Calendar of Documents Relating to Scotland 1357-1509, Vol. 4, p. 110, no. 518]




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