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Descendants of Edward Doty (revised 5/4/2007 Generation 3)

 

Generation No. 1

1. EDWARD1 DOTY was born May 14, 1598 in St. Mary LeStrandParish, Thurburton Hill, Suffolk, England, and died August 23, 1655 in Plymouth, Ma.. He married FAITH CLARK January 06, 1642/43 in Plymouth, Ma., daughter of THURSTON CLARK and FAITH LOCS. She was born Abt. 1619 in on ship Franci Ma. Ipswixh, Suffolkshire, England, and died February 21, 1674/75 in Yarmouth, Barnstable.

Notes for EDWARD DOTY:
Data obtained for Doty was from three sources

1. Book Families of the Pilgrams, Edward Doty 1955
2. Records of Pearl Dalton, compiled form NY public library approx 1953
3. Interner G317 file from www.archivy.com
4. Doty-Doten Family History Book - Brooklyn 1897

Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

 

Governor William Bradford, the second Governor of the Plymouth Colony, who succeeded to that office upon the death of Governor Carver in 1621, was himself one of the most prominent emigrants by the Mayflower. His History of Plymouth Plantation, which was completed in 1650, really comprises a diary of his life there.

In the appendix of that history he gives a list of the "Passengers of the Mayflower," as follows:

"The names of those which came over first in ye year 1620, and were by the blessing of God the first beginers and (in a sort) the foundation of all the Plantations and Colonies in New England: and their families."

Then follows the list, in which occurs the family of Stephen Hopkins, as follows:

"Mr. Stephen Hopkins & Elizabeth, his wife, and 2 children called Giles and Constanta, a doughter, both by a former wife; and 2 more by this wife, caled Damaris and Oceanus; the last borne at Sea; and 2 servants called Edward Doty and Edward Litster."

And then he continues (writing in 1650):

"And seeing it hath pleased him to give me to see thirty years compleated since these beginnings; and that the great works of his providence are to be observed, I have though it not unworthy of my paines to take a veiu of the decreasings & increasings of these persons, and such change as hath pased over them & theirs, in this thirty years. It may be of some use to such as come after; but however I shall reste in my owne benefite. I will therefore take them in order as they lye."

And then follows, in the same order as in the original list, each family, with its changes, and next the family of Stephen Hopkins, this account:

"Edward Doty & Edward Litster, the servants of Mr. Hopkins. Litster, after he was set at liberty went to Virginia & ther dyed. But Edward Doty by a second wife hath 7 children and both he and they are living."

The history of the Pilgrims, as stated by Governor Bradford in his history of Plymouth Plantation, shows that the Puritans from sundry towns and villages in Nottinghamshire, Lincolnshire, and some of Yorkshire, to escape inconveniences and persecutions, removed about 1608-9 to the Low Countries. There came also some from London and other parts. They settled first at Amsterdam, but in a year removed to Leyden, where they lived till 1620.

About the first of August of that year, after many delays, they sailed to Southampton, and on the 15th the Mayflower and Speedwell sailed from that port to the New World with 120 passengers, some of whom had but just joined the company. Disasters to the Speedwell compelled a return of both vessels to Plymouth, where she was abandoned and some of the passengers gave up the voyage. But on the 6th of September, the Mayflower, with the remaining 102 passengers, finally sailed, and after a stormy voyage of sixty-five days dropped anchor in Cape Cod harbor on the 11th of November following.

Under that date Mourt's "Relation" states"

"This day before we came to harbour, observing some not well affected to unity and concord, but gave some appearance of faction, it was thought good there should be an association and agreement, that we should combine together in one body, and to submit to such government and governors as we should, by common consent, agree to make and choose, and set our hands to this as follows, word for word."

Bradford, writing of the same, says it was "occasioned partly by ye discontented & mutinous speeches that some of the strangers amongst them had let fall from them in ye ship. That when they came ashore they would use their own libertie:" etc.

The agreement or compact is as follows:

"In ye name of God, Amen. We whose names are underwritten, the loyall subjects of our dread soveraigne Lord, King James; by ye grace of God, of Great Britaine, Franc. & Ireland king, defender of ye faith, &c., haveing undertaken, for ye glorie of God, and advancemente of ye Christian faith, and honour of our king & countrie, a voyage to plant ye first colonie in ye Northerne parts of Virginia, doe by these presents solemnly & mutualy in ye presence of God, and one of another, covenant & combine our selves together into a civill body politick; for our better ordering & preservation & furtherance of ye ends aforesaid: and by virtue hearof to enacte, constitute, and frame such just & equall lawes, ordinances, acts, constitutions, & offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meete & convenient for ye generall good of ye Colonie, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.

"In witnes whereof we have hereunder subscribed our names at Cape Codd ye 11. of November, in ye year of ye raigne of our soveraigne lord, King James, of England, France, & Ireland ye eighteenth, and of Scotland, ye fiftie-fourth. Ano Dom. 1620."

To this compact were signed the names of each male member of the company, and among them that of Edward Doty.

Stephen Hopkins, with his family and servants, were among those who joined th party of emigrants at Southampton on their arrival from Leyden. He was a tanner or leather maker by trade and the term servant probably indicates a workman or, in this case, an apprentice.

They had been residents of London, and in many ways it is shown that these were not considered as being of the same mind and spirit as the others, who were so closely knit together by their long residence in Leyden. It is probable that the newcomers were actuated by a greater spirit of adventure in emigrating to the New World, and that they were less ready to acknowledge the authority of the Governor of the new Colony, who seems to have already been chosen, while it is certain that some at least were not in full sympathy with the religious ideas and the motives that guided the actions of the leaders.

Disaffection with the general interests of the party had appeared during the voyage sufficient to create suspicion, and it was probably owing to this that the famous compact was drawn up.

Edward Dotey was invited to sign this compact on board the Mayflower after its arrival in Cape Cod Harbor and from this time he was treated to all intents and purposes as one of the company, receiving the same allotment of land and stores as all other single men. From this it would seem as if he had at this time reached his majority, though he probably still owed some service to Stephen Hopkins. It has been assumed, however, inasmuch as he is spoken of as a youth, that he had now reached his 21st year, and this is the only indication that we have of the date of his birth.

The Mayflower arrived at Cape Cod on the 11th of November (O.S.), 1620, and the first duty of the emigrants was the necessity of looking for a suitable place of habitation in this new country. They had bought "a large shalop with them out of England" but the boat had been so much bruised and shattered by the rough weather on the voyage that it was found it would take some days to properly repair it. Whereupon a few volunteered to go by land, making such discoveries as they could, while the shallop was being put in order. "It was conceived ther might be some danger in ye attempte, yet seeing them resolute, they were permitted to goe, being 16 of them well armed, under ye conduct of Captain Standish," to whom was joined for advice and counsel William Bradford, Stephen Hopkins and Edward Tilley. It is probabe that Edward Doty was one of this party. They started on the 15th of November and were gone several days, marching along by the side of the sea. A few Indians whom they met ran away from them and they found some Indian corn, which had been buried, probably for future use, which they bore back to this ship, having never seen any such before.

After this, the shallop being ready, a party of thirty sailed to the same neighborhood, where it had been thought a suitable harbor might be found. They discovered some deserted houses of the Indians and much corn and beans, which they carried away and which served them for seed the next spring; but the harbor was found unsatisfactory.

The month of November being thus spent, and "much foule weather falling in, the 6. of Desemr. they sent out their shallop againe with 10. of their principall men & some sea men upon further discovery."

The account appended is from Mourt's "Relation" (now recognized as a Journal by Geo. Morton, one of the pilgrims, and identical in many parts with Governor William Bradford's history).

"Wednesday, the sixt of December (1620), it was resolved our discoverers should set forth, for the day before was too fowle weather and so they did, though it was well ore the day ere all things could be readie. So ten of our men were appointed who were of themselves willing to undertake it, to wit, Captaine Standish, Maister Carver, William Bradford, Edward Winsloe, John Tilley, Edward Tilley, John Houland, and three of London: Richard Warren, Steeuen Hopkins, and Edward Dotte and two of our Sea-men, John Alderton, and Thomas English, of the Ships Company there went two of the Masters Mates, Master Clarke, and Master Copin, the Master Gunner and three Saylers.

The narration of which discovery follows, penned by one of the Company. (Undoubtedly William Bradford, as it is identical with the account in his history.)

Notes for FAITH CLARK:
per MAYFLOWER INCREASINGS by Susan Roser

Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

Children of EDWARD DOTY and FAITH CLARK are:
i. MARY2 DOTY, b. Abt. 1653.
ii. ELIZABETH DOTY, b. Abt. 1647.
iii. DESIRE DOTY, b. 1646.
iv. JOHN DOTY, b. Abt. 1640.
2. v. ISAAC DOTY, b. February 08, 1648/49, Plymouyh, MA; d. September 1728, Oyster Bay, L.I., NY.
vi. JOSEPH DOTY, b. April 30, 1651.
vii. THOMAS DOTY, b. Bet. 1641 - 1642.
viii. SAMMUEL DOTY, b. Bet. 1643 - 1644.
ix. EDWARD DOTY, b. Abt. 1637.

 

Generation No. 2

2. ISAAC2 DOTY (EDWARD1) was born February 08, 1648/49 in Plymouyh, MA, and died September 1728 in Oyster Bay, L.I., NY. He married ELIZABETH ENGLAND 1673. She was born Abt. 1649 in Portsmouth, RI.

Notes for ISAAC DOTY:
Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

Doty-Doten Family History, Brooklyn, 1897

The will of Hugh Parsons, of Portsmouth, R. I., made January 11, 1684, and proved March 14 of the same year, gives certain legacies to his wife's two daughters living on Long Island, Susannah Carpenter and Elizabeth Doty. The records of Portsmouth show that Hugh Parsons married Elizabeth, widow of William England. She was born 1613 and died soon after her second husband in 1684. They lived at Portsmouth, and Susannah England, daughter of William and Elizabeth England, married, at Oyster Bay, L. I., December 3d, 1677, as his second wife, Ephraim Carpenter, son of William Carpenter and Elizabeth Arnold. Mrs. Susannah Carpenter died in 1684, and Ephraim Carpenter married a third wife, Lydia Dickenson. He died 1703.

While these records give no date, so far discovered, of the marriage of Isaac Doty and Elizabeth England, they sufficiently establish that marriage. It is probable that Elizabeth England was born at Portsmouth, about 1651 to 1655, and that she married Isaac Doty at Oyster Bay, about 1673. By this marriage there were six sons, for beside those named above, another, Solomon, appears as witness to one of the deeds. If there were any daughters, there is nothing upon the records that implies it, and the only reason for this belief of their existence is in some probable gaps between the births of the sons.

Nowhere after Isaac Doty's settlement at Oyster Bay is his name ever written as Doten, nor does that spelling anywhere appear among his descendants. His name is given in the various documents quoted above as Doty, Dotey, Dottie, and in other ways that imply the same pronunciation, and even as Doughty, but never with the termination "en." The frequency of the spelling Doughty is undoubtedly owing to the presence in the western part of the same country on Long Island of the very numerous and influential family of that name, descended from the Rev. Francis Doughty of Maspeth or Newtown, between whom and the Oyster Bay residents there must have been frequent intercourse. Indeed the fact that Isaac Doty in the deed noted above, dated July 5th, 1672, at Plymouth, is called "Alias Isaac Doughty," leads to the supposition that he had previously visited Oyster Bay, as in that locality alone was he likely to have received this alias.

But notwithstanding this occasional misspelling on the records of the town, the name Doty never seems to have been lost or given up by either Isaac Doty or his descendants. It occurs frequently enough, and especially late in his life, to show that he held to it, and of his children but one ever appears to have even occasionally used the name of Doughty. This one, James, who continued to live in the immediate vicinity of Oyster Bay, and whose descendants are still to be found there, was sometimes known as James Doughty, but his descendants are uniformly called Doty and have been for generations wherever they may live. And still nowhere among the living representatives of Isaac Doty was there any tradition or record tracing their ancestry to the Plymouth emigrant.

The feeling throughout this branch has been universal that its ancestor came directly from England to Oyster Bay, and that he was a member of the Doughty family, and this has been fortified by traditions accompanied, perhaps, by visions of great estates abroad held "in chancery" that have been nourished by several generations, the details, with increasing particularity, passing from father to son and to grandson. All knowledge of their Plymouth origin had become, by their isolation from the other branches, entirely obliterated.

It may be readily seen from the documents already quoted that Isaac Doty was of an exceptionally strong character. He possessed in a marked degree that element of industry and thrift which characterized, to greater or less extent, every one of the children of Edward Doty. With an energy that was commendable, he pushed out to a new territory, constantly extended his lines, and lived to see a prosperous settlement and each one of his sons provided with a farm well cleared and tilled, which his foresight had made possible, and which his fatherly affection had secured.

Upright in all his dealings, his word was respected by his neighbors, who were glad to refer their disputes to his arbitration. He was an active member and supporter of the established church of his town, and encouraged the attendance of his family. His posterity have generally maintained these characteristics, and there have been no more solid and highly esteemed men in the localities where they have lived than his immediate descendants on Long Island and in the western part of Dutchess County, N. Y.

Notes for ELIZABETH ENGLAND:
Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

Children of ISAAC DOTY and ELIZABETH ENGLAND are:
3. i. ISAAC3 DOTY, b. Abt. 1673, Oyster Bay, L.I., NY.
ii. JOSEPH DOTY, b. 1680.
iii. JACOB DOTY, b. Bef. June 10, 1683.
iv. SOLOMON DOTY, b. 1689.
v. JAMES DOTY, b. December 21, 1693.
vi. SAMUEL DOTY, b. 1695.

 

Generation No. 3

3. ISAAC3 DOTY (ISAAC2, EDWARD1) was born Abt. 1673 in Oyster Bay, L.I., NY. He married ELIZABETH JACKSON, daughter of JOHN JACKSON and SARAH DOTY.

Notes for ISAAC DOTY:
Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

Doty-Doten Family History, Brookly 1897

6893. ISAAC DOTY, son of Isaac Doty and Elizabeth England, b. Oyster Bay, N. Y., about 1678; m. He married prob. ca. 1700 ELIZABETH ----------, Her maiden name may have been Jackson, as reported by Seaman: but she was not the daughter of Col. John and Elizabeth (Seaman) Jackson as stated by Doty. That Elizabeth Jackson m. Charles Doughty.

His name first appears in deeds, 1695, but frequently after that date.

March 29, 1697. His father conveyed to him by gift, a farm.

1705-8. Isaac Doty, Jr., chosen church warden for Oyster Bay.

November 24, 1716. His "ear marks" are entered on the town records.

July 30, 1718. He buys of the executors of his brother, Joseph, an equal one-third part of a farm given by his father to Joseph, Jacob, and James Doty.

Notes for ELIZABETH JACKSON:
SOURCE CITATION: Title: (See source comments) Source Comments: Brøderbund WFT Vol. 7, Ed. 1, Tree #1141, Date of Import: 25
Apr 1997

Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

Children of ISAAC DOTY and ELIZABETH JACKSON are:
4. i. ISAAC4 DOTY, b. 1704, Oyster Bay, L.I., NY; d. July 1777, Jericho, NY.
ii. MARY DOTY, b. 1710.

 

Generation No. 4

4. ISAAC4 DOTY (ISAAC3, ISAAC2, EDWARD1) was born 1704 in Oyster Bay, L.I., NY, and died July 1777 in Jericho, NY. He married (1) SARAH TITUS. She was born March 07, 1708/09 in Queens, NY, and died August 30, 1772 in Jericho, NY. He married (2) HANNAH SEAMAN September 07, 1733 in Hempstead, L.I., NY, daughter of RICHARD SEAMAN and JANE MOTT. She was born March 07, 1708/09 in Hempstead, L.I, NY, and died July 26, 1753 in Jericho, NY.

Notes for ISAAC DOTY:
Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

 

Doty-Doten Family History, Broklyn 1897

6899. ISAAC DOTY, son Isaac Doty and Elizabeth Jackson, b. Oyster Bay, N. Y., 1697-1704; m., 1st, Hempstead, N. Y., about 1730, Hannah Seaman, , b. there June 11, 1710 (O. S.), dau. Richard Seaman and Jane Mott. She d. Jericho, N. Y., July 26, 1753. He m. 2d, there Dec. 3, 1755, Mrs. Sarah Titus, dau. John Titus, Sr. and Sarah Willis and widow Edmund Titus of Wheatly, Long Island, b. Queens Co., N. Y., March 18, 1708 (N. S.). They lived Jericho, where she d. Aug. 30, 1772 and he d. May 11, 1777.

He was a prominent member of the Socieety of Friends. His "earmarks" are entered on the town records of Hempstead, Dec. 15, 1733. Earmark, "a swallow fork on the near ear, and a half penny on each side of the same." 1738-9, he was overseer of the highways of the district.

Notes for HANNAH SEAMAN:
Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

Children of ISAAC DOTY and HANNAH SEAMAN are:
5. i. SAMUEL5 DOTY, b. Abt. 1745, Jericho, NY; d. 1823, Hempstead, L.I, NY.
ii. RICHARD DOTY, b. Abt. 1731.
iii. ISAAC DOTY, b. Abt. 1733.
iv. ELIZABETH DOTY.
v. HANNAH DOTY, b. August 29, 1760.

 

Generation No. 5

5. SAMUEL5 DOTY (ISAAC4, ISAAC3, ISAAC2, EDWARD1) was born Abt. 1745 in Jericho, NY, and died 1823 in Hempstead, L.I, NY. He married CATHERINE BALDWIN Abt. 1775 in Oyster Bay, NY, daughter of BENJAMIN BALDWIN. She died Aft. 1830.

Notes for SAMUEL DOTY:
Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

Notes for CATHERINE BALDWIN:
Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

Children of SAMUEL DOTY and CATHERINE BALDWIN are:
6. i. RACHEL6 DOTY, b. September 21, 1781; d. December 29, 1846, Hempstead, L.I, NY.
ii. MARY DOTY, b. March 01, 1777.
iii. SAMUEL DOTY, b. February 28, 1779.
iv. DAVID DOTY, b. December 05, 1783.
v. GEORGE DOTY, b. July 18, 1789.
vi. JANE DOTY, b. January 09, 1792.
vii. ELIZABE DOTY.

 

Generation No. 6

6. RACHEL6 DOTY (SAMUEL5, ISAAC4, ISAAC3, ISAAC2, EDWARD1) was born September 21, 1781, and died December 29, 1846 in Hempstead, L.I, NY. She married SAMUEL JACKSON August 12, 1804 in Hempstead, L.I., NY. He was born 1782, and died September 16, 1852 in Hempstead, NY.

Notes for RACHEL DOTY:
Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

Doty-Doten Family of America Book
Decendents of Edward Doty, An emigrant of the Mayflower, 1620
Compiled by: Ethan Alan Doty
Published by the author
Brooklyn, NY 1897
page 522

More About RACHEL DOTY:
Burial: 1846, Hempstead Old Town Burying Ground

Notes for SAMUEL JACKSON:
Mayflower Families
Through Five Generations
Volume 11, part 3
ISBN No 0-930270-12-6
First printing, 2000

Inscriptions from Hempstead's Old Town Buring Ground
The NY Genealogical & Biographical Record
Vol LIV No 1-4
Jan- Oct 1923

Doty-Doten Family of America Book
Decendents of Edward Doty, An emigrant of the Mayflower, 1620
Compiled by: Ethan Alan Doty
Published by the author
Brooklyn, NY 1897
page 522

More About SAMUEL JACKSON:
Burial: 1852, Hempstead Old Town Burying Ground

Children of RACHEL DOTY and SAMUEL JACKSON are:
7. i. DAVID D.7 JACKSON, b. January 1807; d. September 05, 1877, Hempstead, NY.
ii. MOSES JACKSON.
iii. THOMAS JACKSON.
iv. CATHARINE JACKSON, b. January 16, 1815.
v. HENRY JACKSON, b. January 03, 1818.

 

Generation No. 7

7. DAVID D.7 JACKSON (RACHEL6 DOTY, SAMUEL5, ISAAC4, ISAAC3, ISAAC2, EDWARD1) was born January 1807, and died September 05, 1877 in Hempstead, NY. He married KAZIAH VERITY. She was born 1814, and died Aft. 1880.

Notes for DAVID D. JACKSON:
US 1800 Census

Samuel Jackson (father)
2 males 25 to 45 years old
2 children under 10

US 1840 census, Schedule 4, Line 14

David Jackson
Town Of Hempstead, Queens County, NY
1 male 10 to 15 1 female less than 5
1 male 15 to 20 1 female 5 to 10
1 male 40 to 50 2 female 10 to 15
1 female 30 to 40

Inscrptions from Hempstead's Old Town Burying Grounds
Lot 107
NY Genalogical & Biographical Recors
Vol LV, 1924

Doty-Doten Family of America Book
Decendents of Edward Doty, An emigrant of the Mayflower, 1620
Compiled by: Ethan Alan Doty
Published by the author
Brooklyn, NY 1897
page 549
At Sutro Library Micro Fish G3 G1006

 

 

More About DAVID D. JACKSON:
Burial: September 1877, Hempstead Old Town Burying Ground (Lot 107)

Notes for KAZIAH VERITY:
US Census 1880

22nd Ward, District 4, Brooklyn, Kings(Brooklyn), NY City - Greater NY
Family History Library Film 124855
NA Film Number T9-0855
Page 1661

Children of DAVID JACKSON and KAZIAH VERITY are:
8. i. MARY ELIZABETH8 JACKSON, b. August 09, 1833, Belmore, LI, NY; d. January 20, 1922, Roslyn, NY.
ii. SAMUEL JACKSON, b. January 1840; d. September 18, 1863, Hempstead, NY.

More About SAMUEL JACKSON:
Burial: September 1863, Hempstead Old Town Burying Ground (Lot 107)

iii. BENJAMIN JACKSON.

Notes for BENJAMIN JACKSON:
Lives in New Haven, CT

iv. JOHN JACKSON.

 

Generation No. 8

8. MARY ELIZABETH8 JACKSON (DAVID D.7, RACHEL6 DOTY, SAMUEL5, ISAAC4, ISAAC3, ISAAC2, EDWARD1) was born August 09, 1833 in Belmore, LI, NY, and died January 20, 1922 in Roslyn, NY. She married WILLIAM HENRY WEST Abt. 1861, son of JOHN WEST and AMELIA ?. He was born October 13, 1833, and died December 03, 1913.

Notes for MARY ELIZABETH JACKSON:
Death Certificate 4690, registration number 13
Place of death District no 2951
Flushing Turnpike Ward
Date of issue Jan 21, 1922

Doty-Doten Family of America Book
Decendents of Edward Doty, An emigrant of the Mayflower, 1620
Compiled by: Ethan Alan Doty
Published by the author
Brooklyn, NY 1897
page 549

More About MARY ELIZABETH JACKSON:
Burial: January 22, 1922, Greenfield Cemetery, Hempstead, NY

Notes for WILLIAM HENRY WEST:
Data confirmed in the 1900 US Census

Vol 116, ED 711, Sheet 5, Line 64

 

Data confirmaed in the 1880 Us Census

Family History Library 1254919
NA Film number T9-0919
Page 333a

Children of MARY JACKSON and WILLIAM WEST are:
9. i. WILLIAM EDGAR9 WEST, b. November 15, 1863, NY; d. October 01, 1922, Roslyn Heights, NY.
ii. JOHN WEST, b. 1864.
iii. EMMA WEST, b. 1867.
iv. ALICE WEST, b. 1871.

 

Generation No. 9

9. WILLIAM EDGAR9 WEST (MARY ELIZABETH8 JACKSON, DAVID D.7, RACHEL6 DOTY, SAMUEL5, ISAAC4, ISAAC3, ISAAC2, EDWARD1) was born November 15, 1863 in NY, and died October 01, 1922 in Roslyn Heights, NY. He married PHEBE SMITH PINKHAM, daughter of ZEBARIAH PINKHAM and SUSAN SMITH. She was born 1866 in NY, and died 1956 in NY.

Notes for WILLIAM EDGAR WEST:
Data confirmed in the 1900 US Census

Vol 116, ED 711, Sheet 6, Line 59

NY Death Certificate #59348 Registration number 174
District 2951
Nassau County, Town North Hempstead
Village Roslyn

More About WILLIAM EDGAR WEST:
Burial: October 1922, Greenfield Cemetery, Hempstead, NY

More About PHEBE SMITH PINKHAM:
Burial: 1956, Greenfield Cemetery, Hempstead, NY

Children of WILLIAM WEST and PHEBE PINKHAM are:
10. i. EARL PINKHAM10 WEST, b. December 15, 1900; d. May 1977.
ii. PEARL LOIS WEST, b. August 08, 1892; d. July 1975; m. ALFRED G. DALTON.
11. iii. GRACE ELIZABETH WEST, b. June 08, 1898, Roslyn, LI, NY; d. June 07, 1962, Hempstead, L.I, NY.
iv. BENJIMAN RAY WEST, b. 1895; d. 1901.

More About BENJIMAN RAY WEST:
Burial: 1901, Greenfield Cemetery, Hempstead, NY

 

Generation No. 10

10. EARL PINKHAM10 WEST (WILLIAM EDGAR9, MARY ELIZABETH8 JACKSON, DAVID D.7, RACHEL6 DOTY, SAMUEL5, ISAAC4, ISAAC3, ISAAC2, EDWARD1) was born December 15, 1900, and died May 1977. He married MADELINE BLATZ. She was born 1907, and died 1995 in Florida.

More About EARL PINKHAM WEST:
Burial: 1977, Greenfield Cemetery, Hempstead, NY

More About MADELINE BLATZ:
Burial: 1995, Greenfield Cemetery, Hempstead, NY

Children of EARL WEST and MADELINE BLATZ are:
i. JOYCE11 WEST.
ii. DOTHERY WEST.

 

11. GRACE ELIZABETH10 WEST (WILLIAM EDGAR9, MARY ELIZABETH8 JACKSON, DAVID D.7, RACHEL6 DOTY, SAMUEL5, ISAAC4, ISAAC3, ISAAC2, EDWARD1) was born June 08, 1898 in Roslyn, LI, NY, and died June 07, 1962 in Hempstead, L.I, NY. She married NORMAN JOHN ABRAMS June 12, 1925 in Methodist Church, Roslyn, NY, son of JOHN ABRAMS and MABLE SCOTT. He was born August 25, 1898 in Hempstead, L.I, NY, and died December 31, 1967 in Hempstead, L.I, NY.

More About GRACE ELIZABETH WEST:
Burial: June 1962, Greenfield Cemetery, Hempstead, NY

Notes for NORMAN JOHN ABRAMS:
Confirmed US Census 1930

Reel 1457, ED 30-43, Sheet 40
Line: 21 Covert Street, Hempstead Village, LI, NY
Norman John Abrams

More About NORMAN JOHN ABRAMS:
Burial: 1968, Greenfield Cemetery, Hempstead, NY

Children of GRACE WEST and NORMAN ABRAMS are:
i. CLAYTON W.11 ABRAMS, b. August 15, 1936, Hempstead, L.I, NY; m. ELAINE MARTIN, November 25, 1962, Yonkers, NY; b. April 18, 1936, Yonkers, NY.
ii. NORMAN DAVID ABRAMS, b. July 19, 1927; d. 1937.