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1. Virginia Additon (Gini) Giberson1,2,3,4 was born on 21 December 1930 in Auburn, Maine (Androscoggin).3,4,5 She lived in Auburn, Maine (Androscoggin) in 1940.4 She was adopted in 1946 in West Auburn, Maine (Androscoggin). Written on birth certificate by her mother - adopted by Wilbert Hammond Fifield. Virginia lived in Auburn, Maine (Androscoggin) in March 1951.2 In 1951 she was a silver counselor in Auburn, Maine (Androscoggin).6 She lived in Auburn, Maine (Androscoggin) in November 1951.6 Virginia lived in Los Angeles, California (Los Angeles) in April 1955.1 She lived on the Gibb's Mill road in Livermore, Maine between 1959 and 1962.7 She lived 3410 Lemon Street in Pahrump, Nevada (Nye) between 2000 and 2004.7 Virginia died on 8 January 2004 at the age of 73 in Pahrump, Nevada (Nye).5,7 She was buried on 5 June 2005 in Lane Cemetery, Poland, Maine (Androscoggin). Some ashes buried here - marker says Virginia Additon Giberson. Buried in the family plot with and near her grandparents, and other relatives. A very hot Sunday - 111 degrees on the car thermometer - 95 degrees ambient air temp. A traditional Pipe Ceremony was done for her by her son Michael Walton, aka Nitamabidhamaiwimen. In attendance were her Aunt Edith Norris, her sister Margaret and her sister's husband Fred Bragdon. Mike's wife Soft Spoken Decker was also there assisting in the ceremony. Mother is free and unfettered - we put the ashes in the dirt - no bags or boxes to hold her down.

Mom's request was to be scattered in the mountains of California. I also wanted a gravestone and some remains to place in the cemetery where generations of our family was buried back In Poland, Maine.

In Las Vegas my brother Rick and I mixed her ashes with a former boyfriends at her request and then split the ashes in half. When we were done I placed my half in the trunk of my rental car. As I walked away to talk to Rick the container with her ashes came out of the trunk and landed on the ground. You explain it as I cannot. I told Rick I guessed Mom did not want to ride in the trunk so I picked up the container and placed her on the front seat and seat belted her in.

A year later the people listed for the funeral ceremony were all walking to the site in the small cemetery. The ashes I had were in a plastic bag inside a black plastic box with a snap lid that you had to really work at to open. I had the box under my arm. A audible pop was heard and the bag with her ashes was on the ground. I picked the remains up and told Mom she was going to be buried here whether she liked it or not. Five generations are currently resting at the Lane Cemetery. She was 1/2048 Wampanoag/Narragansett Indian from mother. Virginia had Social Security Number 007-26-9808.5 Virginia Additon Giberson, also known as Fifield, Walton, Grady, Hooper, Donato, and finally as Segedi. Legally changed her name to Gini Segedi.


From the Las Vegas Review Journal:

Published January 16, 2004.

SEGEDI, GINI

Gini Segedi, born Dec. 21, 1930 in Auburn, Maine, passed away Jan. 8, 2004 at home in Pahrump. She was 73. She was a bookseller in San Diego and Las Vegas. She was an active 10 meter Ham radio operator with many awards and certificates. She also had been a police records clerk in Tucson, Ariz. She is survived by her mother, Bonnie Fifield of Auburn, Maine; aunt, Edith Norris of Auburn, Maine; three sons, Michael William Walton and his wife Soft Spoken, Jack Lawrence Hooper and his wife, Erin and Rick Hooper and his wife Christy Shalitta. She leaves behind 11 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Private family services will be held.


From the Las Vegas Review Journal:

Date: January 16, 2004
From: Bob Coffin
City/State: Las Vegas

Gini was a friend and a colleague in the book selling business. I knew her from her first days in Las Vegas more than 20 years ago when she and her husband set up a store selling fine books on many subjects. Gini was an expert in many fields of book selling and any other subject you wished to discuss. In other words, Gini was able to offer an opinion on anything and anybody and her opinions were strong. Gini could see right through a phony and had no problem pointing out deceptions in the book trade. Several of her colleagues were taken to task when she felt they were not accurately describing their wares or were overstating their prices. No one could escape her straight shooting approach, and, you could always count on getting good product at a fair price from her. The book selling community misses her acerbic wit and her skills. We have missed her active participation in recent years as illness took its toll. We will now miss her more than ever. Bob Coffin