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Are you a Genealogist
Well now's the time to see. 
If you relate to these below, 
then yes, you just may be!
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On this page:

Top 10 Ways to Tell You're a Genealogist
You Know You're Addicted When
Murphy's Law of Genealogy
More Laws of Genealogy
Genealogy "Taglines"

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A Page of their Own:

Genie Poems
Christmas Poems

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Up we go!
"Top Ten Ways to 
Tell You're a Genealogist"
  • 10 You talk about towns no one has ever heard of.

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  • 9   You take a trip to Salt Lake City in winter and don't ski.

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  • 8   You read EVERY Roots-L Posting.

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  • 7   You never leave home without $4 in quarters.

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  • 6   You call ATM's "stamp machines".

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  • 5   You've memorized the counties, their seats, and their addresses for three states.

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  • 4   You KNOW that people who have been dead for 200 years are laughing at you.

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  • 3   You visit cemeteries carrying food and cosmetics.

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  • 2   You check out office supply stores "just looking".

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  • 1   You've changed computer programs three times this year.

  • Just a Bar

    ...and it's Yours Truly...
    Just a Bar

    Up we go!
    You know you're an
    addicted Genealogist when:
  • When you brake for libraries.

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  • If you get locked in a library overnight and you never even notice.

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  • When you hyperventilate at the sight of an old cemetery.

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  • If you'd rather browse in a cemetery than a shopping mall.

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  • When you think every home should have a microfilm reader.

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  • If you'd rather read census schedules than a good book.

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  • When you know every town clerk in your state by name.

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  • If town clerks lock the doors when they see you coming.

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  • When you are more interested in what happened in 1895 than 1995.

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  • If you store your clothes under the bed and your closet is carefully stacked with notebooks and journals.

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  • When Mitchel, Davis, and Tenney are household names, but you can't remember what you call your dog.

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  • If you can pinpoint Harrietsham, Hawkhurst, Kent on a map of England, but can't locate Topeka, Kansas.

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  • When all your correspondence begins "Dear Cousin."

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  • If you've traced every one of your ancestral lines back to Adam and Eve, have it fully documented, and still don't want to quit.

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    Um, make that Obsession!

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    Up we go! Murphy's Law of Genealogy
  • The records you need for your family history were in the courthouse that burned.

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  • John, son of Thomas, the immigrant whom your relatives claim as immigrant ancestor, died on board ship at the age of twelve.

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  • The public ceremony in which your distinguished ancestor participated when the platform collapsed turned out to be a hanging.

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  • Records show that the grandfather, whom the family boasted, "He read the Bible at four years and graduated from college at sixteen," was at the foot of his class.

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  • Your grandmother's maiden name for which you've searched for years was on an old letter in a box in the attic all the time.

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  • When at last you have solved the mystery of the skeleton in the closet the tight-lipped spinster aunt claimed, "I could have told you that all the time."

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  • You never asked your father about his family because you weren't interested in genealogy while he was alive.

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  • The family story your grandmother wrote for the family never got past the typist. She packed it away "somewhere" and promised to send you a copy, but never did.

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  • The relative who had all the family photographs gave them to her daughter who had no interest in genealogy and no inclination to share.

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  • A great-uncle changed his surname because he was teased in school. He moved away, left no address, and was never heard from again.

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  • Brittle old newspapers containing the information you desired have fallen apart on the names and dates and places.

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  • The only record you find for your great-grandfather is that his property was sold at a sheriff's sale for insolvency.

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  • The portion of the index you need is continued in the next issue, only the publisher died prior to publication.

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  • When you find the obituary for your grandmother, the information is garbled. Her name is exchanged with her daughter's, the whereabouts of her sons is unknown, the date for her father's birth indicates he was younger than she was.

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  • The only surname not found among the three billion in the Mormon Archives is yours.

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  • The vital records director sends you a negative reply, having just been insulted by a creep calling himself a genealogist.

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  • The 4 volume, 4,800 page history of the county where your great-grandfather lived is not indexed.

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    I leaf thru mine...!

    Just a Bar

    I see it WAY up there!
    MORE
    LAWS OF GENEALOGY
  • The document containing evidence of the missing link in your research invariably will be lost due to fire, flood, or war.

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  • Your great, great, grandfather's obituary states the he died, leaving no issue of record.

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  • The town clerk you wrote to in desperation, and finally convinced to give you the information you need, can't write legibly and doesn't have a copying machine.

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  • The will you need is in the safe on board the "Titanic."

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  •   The spelling of your European ancestor's name bears no relationship to its current spelling or pronunciation.

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  • That ancient photograph of four relatives, one of whom is your progenitor, carries the names of the other three.

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  • Copies of old newspapers have holes which occur only on last names.

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  • No one in your family tree ever did anything noteworthy, always rented property, was not sued, and was never named in wills.

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  • You learned that great aunt Matilda's executor just sold her life's collection of family genealogical materials to a flea market dealer "somewhere in New York City."

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  • Ink fades and paper deteriorates at a rate inversely proportional to the value of the data recorded.

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  • The 37-volume, sixteen-thousand-page history of your country of origin ISN'T INDEXED.

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  • The critical link in your family tree is named "Smith."- - - - - - - -
  • Copyright 1983 Gibbs Publishing Co., P.O. Box 112, Napoleon, OH 43545


    Just a Bar

    Just a Bar

    Genealogists are time unravelers

    Genealogists do it generation after generation....

    Old genealogists never die, they just lose their census

    Genealogists live in the past lane

    Old genealogists never die, they just haunt cemeteries

    Genealogy - a search for the greatest treasures - our ancestors

    Genealogy...it's not a hobby, it's an obsession

    Genealogy: Chasing your own tale!

    I used to have a life, then I started doing genealogy

    I want to find ALL of them! So far I only have a few thousand

    I'd rather look for dead people than have 'em look for me

    I'm not stuck, I'm ancestrally challenged

    I'm searching for myself; have you seen me?

    If only people came with pull-down menus and on-line help

    Isn't genealogy fun? The answer to one problem, leads to two more!

    My ancestors must be in a witness protection program!

    Only a Genealogist regards a step backwards as progress

    Originality is the art of concealing your sources

    Remember, undocumented genealogy is mythology.

    Share your knowledge, it is a way to achieve immortality

    Try genealogy. You can't get fired and you can't quit!

    Whoever said "seek and ye shall find" was NOT a genealogist

    FLOOR: (n) The place for storing your priceless genealogy records


    Same Bar...!

    And finally:

    Genealogists never die;
    they just lose their census...


    I see it WAY up there!

    Families, like Forests, ever growing, ever strong.